Have you ever been sitting at the traffic lights on your bike, trying in vain to get them to change to green? Try as you might, nothing seems to work. You jump up and down on those pads under the bitumen that set the lights off, but still they stay RED.

Well here is the answer....You see, those pads that you can see under the bitumen that trigger the lights off are not pressure sensitive at all. They do not rely on the weight of the car to set them off, but rather they work by magnetic field. That is, they sense the metal car body to trigger them off.

The way to get a bike to trigger them off is to ride on the very edge of the pad. You see, at the very edge of the pad where you see that black line in the bitumen is where they are most sensitive. At this point they will pick up the metal of the bike frame and trigger the lights.

Happy Cycling!
Howard Duhs

When riding in a group on the road it is important to be able to see what is coming up. As you already know, riding in a closely-knit pack with other cyclists on the road is by far and away much easier than riding alone. But it does present its own hazards.

You need to be able to see if there are any potholes, parked cars, etc., that could jeopardise your safety. That is you need to be able to see what lies ahead on the road. Often this is not easy if you are following 30 or 40 centimetres behind the rider in front.

The natural thing to do when riding in a group or pack of cyclists is to watch the back wheel of the cyclist in front of you. But this is not the best thing. How do you know that he/she is not just about to dodge a pothole and land you straight into it?

The answer is to look past the rear wheel of the rider in front and look through their legs to the road ahead. In that way, you can see what is coming up and you have less chance of having a nasty surprise.

Let me tell you, there is nothing worse than being confronted by a huge pothole just about to take your front wheel out.

Happy Cycling!
Howard Duhs